La Loma Design/Builds First Central American Plaza in the U.S.

Francisco Morazan
Francisco Morazan

The unique lure of Los Angeles lies in its combination of converging cultures and diverse landscapes; which when mixed with expansive urban sprawl, enables the city to create a home for all types of people.  The recently completed Plaza Morazan in the Central American concentrated neighborhood of Westlake is the newest sustainable addition to public space commemorating cultural heritage in Los Angeles and the first ever public space dedicated to Central Americans in the U.S. 

On April 20th, 2013 La Loma staff joined Council Member Ed Reyes, community members, media outlets and even Vice President of Honduras María Guillén de Bográn and Vice President of El Salvador, Salvador Sánchez for the ribbon cutting ceremony. Led by the efforts of several community organizations and Council Member Ed Reyes, Plaza Morazan was designed to be a space to celebrate Central Americans.  

The L.A. Conservation Corps, with the help of La Loma Development, led construction efforts. La Loma led the design, inspired by former LA Creek Freak Joe Linton, which included converting a desolate triangle median, into a pocket park with authentic reclaimed cobble stone, stained poured concrete in the shape of Central American countries, urbanite walls, and drought tolerant plants. In addition to planting basins and overall site grading designed to harvest rainwater, the centerpiece of the plaza is a bronze bust of Francisco Morazan created by 93-year-old Hunduran Sculptor, Mario Zamora.