100 Years of the Natural History Museum

100 Years of the Natural History Museum

Have you been to the Natural History Museum lately? There's a lot going on both inside and outside, with the completion of $135 million renovations (after 12 years), including an impressive 3.5 acre nature garden designed by Mia Lehrer + Associates. The garden is designed to attract wildlife, and includes a gorgeous edible garden, grown with the help of Jimmy Williams and Camille Cimino, as well as artistic tomato cages and trellises made by Ray Cirino. The edible garden is a great example of how to create something beautiful, and practical yet ever changing. 

La Loma also had the opportunity to help with the 27,000 gallon pond by installing a custom woven willow railing fabricated by James Naish, and rework the pond basin with gravel to help attract beneficial bacteria for aquatic plants to thrive, attract birds and dragonflies. There is also a woven willow structure in the children's garden made by Leigh Adams, Dave Lovejoy and Jamie Barnes. Arroyo willow is a native riparian tree in California, and the Becoming L.A. exhibit includes a large willow acorn storage granary from the mid to late 1800s, which could keep properly dried acorns and mesquite beans for up to three years. Becoming L.A. looks at the Spanish Mission Era, Mexican Rancho Era, to now and explores both human and natural influences, including agriculture and includes a wonderful scale model of downtown Los Angeles from 1940 and a 1820s Mediterranean style plow.